Groundhog Day

Groundhog Day

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Week three of lockdown and life is no longer as we know it. “We’re not in Kansas anymore Toto.”

Speaking to people over the last couple of weeks, one question seems to come up a lot:

“What day is it today?”

We’ve all been thrown out of our usual routines and somehow every day seems to be blending into the next. There’s no going out to work, to the gym, to a cafe, to meet family or friends, to the pub. We’re all still trying to do these things in a remote way but there’s just one problem. It all happens in the same place. At home. And it’s starting to feel a bit like Groundhog Day!

For anyone who hasn’t heard of the film Groundhog Day, my first question would be, why? It’s a classic Harold Ramis film from the early 90’s starring the magnificent Bill Murray. Murray plays Phil, a self-centred, obnoxious weatherman who gets sent to the small town of Punxsutawny to cover the story of the famous groundhog who comes out of his burrow on February 2nd to make an anuual weather prediction. Phil hates his job, his colleagues and all the annoying people of this little town. However, one morning he wakes up and realises, he’s reliving the same day, over and over again and it won’t stop. He’s stuck.

While it might not seem like your average self-help coaching film, there’s a lot to learn from Groundhog Day. Whole coaching books have even been written about about The Wisdom of Groundhog Day (Paul Hannam) explaining how the film is not just a comedy but also about self-improvement and self-transformation. The message is pretty simple. Once Phil realizes he can’t change his circumstances and he’s stuck, he chooses to change his attitude and ultimately himself instead. He creates his own ideal day based on creativity, compassion and contribution. He adapts to his surroundings and makes the most of his circumstances, utilizing his time to learn the piano, learn French and be nice to people. He makes friends with the locals, falls in love with his colleague Rita and soon becomes the most popular guy in town. And finally, he’s happy.

In a way, being “stuck” at home in lockdown is similar. We can’t change our circumstances, we can only change our attitude and how we use this time. So here are 5 lessons from Groundhog Day which might help you deal with life in lockdown:

  1. Establish new and better routines. Nobody likes being pushed out of their usual routines. They give us a sense of comfort and control over our lives. To help bring back that feeling, establishing new routines is essential. Try to get up at the same time every day and stick to a morning routine e.g. shower and breakfast. And while you’re at it, why not create some new and better routines. Not all the habits from your pre-corona life may be worth holding on to after all.
  2. Be kind. Take a minute to think about the people you know who might be suffering during this crisis. People who are worried about their jobs, health, they’re home alone or struggling to with work from home while handling their kids. There are a lot of people in difficulty right now. Drop them a mail, give them a call, think of a way you could help from a distance. Helping other is a win-win, as it supports them, it makes you feel good and it takes your focus away from your own problems. And remember this is “physical” distancing rather than “social” distancing. There are plenty of ways to still say social, even if you can’t meet people. Skype, Facetime, Zoom, calling, emails or even the good old-fashioned letter.
  3. Suppress the sea monster. Lockdown does not mean you need to turn into a creature from the deep in pyjamas. Go out, get some fresh air and daylight, have a shower and make yourself look presentable. Feel like you would on a normal working day. Fresh air, daylight and exercise are essential to well-being. Studies of people suffering from depression show that just a few minutes a day walking outside in the fresh air can improve mood and mental health. In the same way, take pride in your work/home space. Declutter and tidy up. Clutter in the home can actually cause anxiety and has been linked to higher levels of cortisol (the stress causing hormone). The last thing anyone needs now is more stress.
  4. Learn a new skill. Phil learns French (to impress Rita) and takes piano lessons. If there’s a skill on your bucket list, perhaps now is the time to get started. Learn that language (there is still time to join my Duolingo experiment), take up knitting, learn how to cook, start writing that novel. Sometimes, the best way of getting things done is to simply begin.
  5. Think about what you can learn going forward from this bizarre experience. Maybe this time has brought you closer to certain people (despite the social distancing), you’ve learnt a new skill or developed good habits. That’s a win and something positive to take away from lockdown. We keep talking about life going back to normal at some point. But perhaps some things will have changed for the better and we can go back to a nicer normal. Think carefully about the future and all the things you really want to do when this is all over. Because at some point, it will be over. As Phil says in the film:

Phil: Do you know what today is?

Rita: No, what?

Phil: Today is tomorrow. It happenend.

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